Historical Significance In 1888, Lovice (Vicey) Skipwith purchased land from the Sir Peyton Skipwith family of Prestwould Plantation, his former owners, near the town of Skipwith. Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries the log cabin on his property…

Historical Significance Black fraternal orders like the Odd Fellows (and similar organizations for women) were popular during the 19th century as places where blacks could hone their business and economic skills, as well as socialize. White Odd…

Historical Significance Oakland Baptist Church, still an active congregation, was founded in 1891 by African-Americans living in the Fort, a village formed on the site of the dismantled Civil War-era Fort Ward. The church was an outgrowth of the Oak…

Historical Significance In 1866 the Mount Zion Baptist Church was first organized under the name “The Old Bell Church” and located in Freedman’s Village in the District of Columbia. When the federal government disbanded…

Historical Significance In 1883, African-American citizens living in the Lucasville area petitioned the Manassas District School Board for an elementary school. The Lucasville School was built in 1885 as a result of their efforts. It was one of…

Historical Significance Laurel Grove School, a one-room school, was built in the early 1880's by free blacks to serve the educational needs of the African American children in the Franconia community of Fairfax County, Virginia. Laurel Grove is one…

Historical Significance The chronology of the Jefferson School building represents the complex post-Civil War history of black education in Charlottesville. In 1865, the Freedman’s Bureau founded Jefferson School in the Delevan Hotel, a former…

Historical Significance Developed in the late 19th century, the Hump was one of five new African-American neighborhoods formed in Alexandria during and after the Civil War. Around the time people settled in the Hump, the abutting Alexandria Canal…

Historical Significance For nearly forty years, the Holley Graded School helped open the doors to greater opportunities for rural black children of the Northern Neck. The school began in 1914 to replace a smaller schoolhouse erected during the…

Historical Significance The "Hill," or "Vinegar Hill" as it was sometimes called, was one of five new black neighborhoods that developed during and after the Civil War. The community connected the two antebellum black neighborhoods, the Bottoms and…