Historical Significance The town of Waterford, Virginia was a place of refuge for African Americans for over 200 years. Waterford was founded in the 1730's by Northern Abolitionist Quakers who were soon outnumbered in the community by other…

Historical Significance Virginia Union University is one of the six historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in Virginia. The school that would become Virginia Union was founded by the American Baptist Home Missionary Society and the…

Historical Significance Virginia's state capitol was designed by Thomas Jefferson in 1785. In part prompted by the Nat Turner rebellion, the General Assembly spent much of its December 1831 session debating the possible abolition of slavery.…

Historical Significance Enslaved labor was essential to the functioning of Shirley Plantation. African Americans tended the fields, harvested the crops, maintained the house, cooked the meals, and provided the majority of skilled labor, including…

Historical Significance Davis Chapel, now Roberts Memorial United Church, provided a safe haven for free and enslaved blacks during a period of growing racial tension in the predominantly white Methodist Episcopal church. The spiritual home of many…

Historical Significance The Ravenscroft neighborhood was incorporated into Petersburg in 1784 and developed soon after. It is bounded on the west by Halifax Street, an important early transportation and commercial corridor leading from Halifax,…

Historical Significance The Howland Chapel School was a one-room school for black children built under the sponsorship of New York educator and philanthropist Emily Howland (1827-1929), an active abolitionist. Howland taught at a school for young…

Historical Significance For nearly forty years, the Holley Graded School helped open the doors to greater opportunities for rural black children of the Northern Neck. The school began in 1914 to replace a smaller schoolhouse erected during the…

Fort Monroe is located at Old Point Comfort (now Hampton, Virginia), where two British privateer ships carrying the first "20-odd" Angolan Africans to Virginia entered the colony in August 1619. The Portuguese, who were waging war in Africa,…

Historical Significance On the morning of August 23, 1831, Belmont was the site of the next-to-last skirmish in the Nat Turner insurrection, the bloodiest and best-known slave revolt in American history. Beginning at the Travis plantation on the…