Historical Significance Uptown, located at the western edge of Alexandria, started as a cluster of homes before the Civil War. Much smaller than the city's older black communities, the Bottoms and Hayti, Uptown was the first black neighborhood…

Historical Significance Uniontown, a small African American community located east of Staunton, was settled predominately by African Americans immediately after the Civil War. The community included the former Federal Cemetery (known today as the…

Historical Significance The efforts of African American students at Robert Russa Moton High School in Prince Edward County to achieve equal educational opportunities led to the end of legal segregation in the public schools of America. Built to…

Historical Significance The St. Luke and Odd Fellows Hall was built in 1905, and is the only building remaining from New Town, an African-American community in Blacksburg that thrived during the first 60 years of the twentieth century. The…

Historical Significance Peabody Colored High School, built in 1874, was the first public school for blacks in Virginia and one of the oldest black public high schools in the South. Between 1870 and 1874, classes were taught out of a black church…

Historical Significance All African-American students in Lynchburg attended the Jackson Street High School, founded in 1881. The African-American community petitioned for a new school, and in 1920 the school board agreed to undertake the project.…

Historical Significance Initially, African Americans worshiped with white Methodists at Stephens City Methodist Church. By 1858, they had a separate house of worship on Mulberry Street, but remained under the supervision of the local white…

Historical Significance Norview High School was one of the six schools in Norfolk attended by members of the "Norfolk 17" in 1958. In the face of the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decision, 151 African American students applied to transfer…

Historical Significance Louisa County's largest "Negro elementary school," Z. C. Morton Elementary School, was built in 1960 to replace several one- and two-room schoolhouses throughout the county, including Mt. Garland, Ferncliff, St. Mark's and…

Historical Significance The chronology of the Jefferson School building represents the complex post-Civil War history of black education in Charlottesville. In 1865, the Freedman’s Bureau founded Jefferson School in the Delevan Hotel, a former…