Historical Significance Tinner Hill, site of the first rural chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is named for Charles and Mary Tinner, an African-American couple who bought land there in the late 1800s.…

Historical Significance Started in 1853, the Stanton family cemetery in rural Buckingham County is one of the state's few surviving burying grounds established by free blacks before the Civil War and held by the same family to the present. The…

Historical Significance The Samuel Bibbins Cemetery is one of the oldest known African-American cemeteries in Northampton County. Samuel Bibbins purchased property from George W. Brittingham in 1851. The first recorded burial in the cemetery…

Historical Significance The Reynolds Homestead is the former Rock Spring Plantation House, the birthplace and boyhood home of tobacco manufacturer R.J. Reynolds. Built in 1843, the two-story brick home has been restored to its nineteenth century…

Historical Significance Petersburg's cemeteries were segregated by race and religion. In 1815, the Petersburg Beneficial Society of Free Men of Color was established to support its free black members in times of sickness and in death. Beneficial…

Historical Significance The Old City Cemetery, originally referred to as the Methodist Cemetery, was established as a public burial ground in 1806. The land was donated by John Lynch and today contains over 20,000 gravesites. The Old City Cemetery…

Historical Significance Oakland Baptist Church, still an active congregation, was founded in 1891 by African-Americans living in the Fort, a village formed on the site of the dismantled Civil War-era Fort Ward. The church was an outgrowth of the Oak…

Historical Significance In 1806, white slave owner Abel West freed all of his slaves by deed. In his 1816 will, West left these freed slaves two hundred acres in Boston, on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The land was given to them and their heirs to…

Historical Significance The nine-acre Freedman's Cemetery was established in Danville in the 1870's for formerly enslaved and free African Americans. It is located behind the Danville National Cemetery, burial ground for Union soldiers who perished…

Historical Significance In the mid-19th century a stone obelisk was erected to memorialize the heroism of Frank Padget, an enslaved man who lost his life during a rescue effort of some 40 people following the worst accident ever to occur on the…