Historical Significance The educational institution now known as the Virginia University of Lynchburg, once called "Virginia College and Virginia Seminary," is one of several Virginia schools of higher education for African Americans founded in the…

Historical Significance Virginia Union University is one of the six historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in Virginia. The school that would become Virginia Union was founded by the American Baptist Home Missionary Society and the…

Historical Significance Virginia State University was the first state-supported African American college in America. Virginia State University was charted in 1882 as the "Virginia Normal and Collegiate Institute" to fulfill a pledge to the…

Historical Significance The "Virginia Randolph Cottage" was the office used by educator Virginia Estelle Randolph (1874-1958). In 1908, Randolph, a Henrico County training school instructor and daughter of parents born enslaved, was appointed the…

Historical Significance The educational institution now known as Virginia College and Virginia Seminary is one of several Virginia schools of higher education founded in the late nineteenth century to help bring the state's blacks into the…

Historical Significance The present elementary school building stands on the site of the Gloucester Training School, established in 1921 through the efforts of Thomas Calhoun Walker (1862-1953) and others as the first free public secondary school…

Historical Significance The Thyne Institute began educating African Americans in Mecklenburg County, Virginia around 1876. J. H. Ashenhurst, the son of a pastor, saw the need for schooling the African American population and began teaching wherever…

Historical Significance The efforts of African American students at Robert Russa Moton High School in Prince Edward County to achieve equal educational opportunities led to the end of legal segregation in the public schools of America. Built to…

Historical Significance The Stubbs School was constructed during the 1930s for African-American children in Spotsylvania County. The school building is typical of many one-room schools built throughout the county, beginning with the establishment of…

Historical Significance St. Francis de Sales school for girls opened on September 8, 1899 in Powhatan, Virginia, the first school Mother Katharine Drexel would build for African Americans. Katharine Drexel was born in 1858, the daughter of Francis…