Historical Significance Built in 1921, Scrabble School's two-room schoolhouse is one of more than 5,000 African-American schools built across the South with the help of Sears Roebuck co-founder Julius Rosenwald, intended to replace sub-standard…

Historical Significance The Smithfield Schoolhouse was built in 1932 as an addition to an original, historic Rosenwald school. The earlier Rosenwald school, built around 1924 and called the Christian Home School, was originally constructed on two…

Historical Significance The Reverend James Solomon Russell (1857-1935), a black Episcopal priest, founded Saint Paul Normal and Industrial School in 1888 to serve the needs of rural blacks in post-Civil War Virginia. With funds contributed by the…

Historical Significance Mrs. S. J. Neil came to Amelia County, Virginia in 1865 while searching for her lost husband, a Union Army officer who died in battle there just prior to the end of the Civil War. Although Mrs. Neil never found her…

Historical Significance The Rock Run School was built as a one-room school for African Americans sometime after the Civil War. The school was apparently already in use by 1882 when the property was deeded to Henry County. With the addition of a…

Historical Significance At the beginning of the twentieth century, there were no public high schools for black children in Henry County. The elementary schools were poorly equipped and lacked the full financial support of communities that white…

Historical Significance Peabody Colored High School, built in 1874, was the first public school for blacks in Virginia and one of the oldest black public high schools in the South. Between 1870 and 1874, classes were taught out of a black church…

Historical Significance In 1888, Lovice (Vicey) Skipwith purchased land from the Sir Peyton Skipwith family of Prestwould Plantation, his former owners, near the town of Skipwith. Throughout the 19th and 20th centuries the log cabin on his property…

Historical Significance Norview High School was one of the six schools in Norfolk attended by members of the "Norfolk 17" in 1958. In the face of the Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka decision, 151 African American students applied to transfer…

Historical Significance Norfolk State University was founded in 1935 during the Great Depression to provide higher education to African Americans in Virginia. At its founding, it was named the Norfolk Unit of Virginia Union University. In 1942, the…