Historical Significance In 1873 the Daughters of Zion, an all female African-American society, created a two-acre independent plot across from the Oakwood Cemetery (the second oldest public cemetery in Charlottesville). The Daughters of Zion…

Historical Significance Court Street Baptist Church is regarded by many as "the mother church" of Lynchburg's black Baptists. The congregation was organized in 1843 when it split from its parent church, the white First Baptist Church. The newly…

Historical Significance The health of the destitute "contrabands" - southern slaves liberated by Union forces during the Civil War - who poured into Alexandria starting in 1861 was precarious. By 1864 at least 1,200 individuals had died, taxing the…

Historical Significance Enslaved and free blacks found ways to establish their own churches and schools despite laws restricting their ability to meet in groups. Founded in 1818 in the Bottoms, Alexandria's oldest African-American neighborhood,…

Historical Significance More than 229 black Civil War soldiers are buried in Alexandria National Cemetery. Originally named Soldiers' Cemetery, the graveyard is one of several national cemeteries built in 1862 to accommodate the war dead.…

Historical Significance Alexander Hill Baptist Church was founded in 1865, and today is considered the oldest African- American Church in Buckingham County. At the end of the Civil War, a prominent local lawyer named Alexander Moseley gave each of…

Historical Significance The African American Heritage Park opened in 1995 as a satellite of the Alexandria Black History Resource Center, located at 638 Alfred St. The memorial sculptures in the park are the creation of Washington, D.C. sculptor…